Thursday, May 3, 2012

Still Learning

I learned something the other day.  I think we should all learn it.  I learned from an exchange student from Denmark.  Her name is Katrine and she is staying with my daughter and family.  Here she is with my daughter, Jackie, and my granddaughter, Courtney (in Watermelon).  BTW--I altered Court's dress before the prom for her--that one was a difficult one!

Anyway, we gave Katrine a ride home from school the other day and she was asking why American kids know nothing of our politics.  She says that they study politics in her home country--quite a bit, and when they are in high school, they understand where they stand personally and with which party they want to align themselves with! (They have 21 parties!!) She was baffled by the ignorance of our kids about their own government. 

What did I learn?  I have always heard: "Stay away from religion and politics" in polite conversation.  Maybe if we did talk about it in civil terms, not just this black and white accusation, we would be better for it.  We might even begin to understand instead of just act like we do!!!

P.S.  Today is the National Day of Prayer,  oops!  That's religion, oh well, pray for our country anyway! :)

12 comments:

Jenny said...

That's a really good point. Growing up, I never wanted to talk about politics because my dad would get super worked up if I ever tried to ask him about other points of view. Now in my late 20s, I still know only the basics and struggle to evaluate candidates and points of view.

MulberryCreek said...

I totally agree. Talking in civil terms is the key and keeping an open mind!

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Paige @ Little Nostalgia said...

I do agree that kids need to learn more about the government in general, but being accusatory about the situation won't help either! Being civil is always the way to go.

Kathleen said...

Very good points. When we were growing up we had lots of friends who went to different churches and synagogs - and we all learned a lot from each other. Problem now is that only one point of view is often all that is taught in the schools.

Oh - I guess that was a bit political ;-)

But, I also prayed for our nation today on this National Day of Prayer!

Great blog post!

Splendid Little Stars said...

a very thought provoking post! certainly worth contemplating by more of us in this country. wouldn't it be wonderful to have reasonable and intelligent conversations on these topics?!

Nancy said...

I think that's because our population tends to be a LOT more stubborn about our beliefs. It's hard to have a polite discussion about these subjects with anyone in the states unless you are like minded because our people seem to be convinced that "choosing" is not how you come into beliefs- craziness!

memoriesforlifescrapbooks said...

It's sad, but most adults don't know enough about our government either or which party they side with.
It's nice to know there are young adults out there wanting to learn more and I hope Katrine's visit continues to be a learning experience for you :)
What beautiful girls!

kitty said...

That was a good lesson to learn from a young person! Happy weekend!!

storybeader said...

yes, they should teach civics in school. They used to. I think it has a lot to do with your family. If the parents (or someone in the family) is involved with politics, more than likely the student will be too. I was! {:-D

Laurie said...

It's always interesting talking to Europeans about politics. What I think it's important to remember there is that their countries are small and typically quite homogenous; with so little diversity, and such a precarious position in the world arena (because of their small size/limited influence), people in these countries are so much more aware of their culture, their place in the world, and how they will make their mark. I think that's why they are sort of politics-obsessed.

Waterrose said...

When I was in high school we had a year of, "problems in democracy." But I think they have since removed that as a requirement. It was an important class...even though at the time...I groaned! But I learned a lot that sticks with me and it makes me a more informed citizen.... Too bad they don't have a class/es like that now.

Judy Nolan said...

When we visited family in Germany, we heard the same comments about young American students being relatively uninformed about politics. My relatives were rather opinionated about their own and others' politics...I cannot say they were always polite. So, I simply practiced being a good listener.